The asphalt jungle

streetsMost of my life, i’ve lived in an urban environment – it’s not where i’d choose to be if i had the option, as i may have mentioned before – but, unfortunately you can’t always get what you want and we just have to make the best of what the hand of fate deals us – it’s pointless to bitch about it.

It’s not all doom and gloom though, because even if i don’t have the time, the opportunity or the weather to escape to the country, sl can provide emotional rescue in the form of the virtual countryside and, no matter how shattered the daily grind of the city may leave me – and sometimes, after a hard day of battling with traffic fumes, people who are just too rude, and going through my nineteenth nervous breakdown of the day, trying to cope with the worst of everything that the urban lifestyle means – i can be feeling pretty beat up. It’s times like these, when the city has left me torn and frayed, that i seek solace in another land – sl.

Having said all that, you’d imagine that after rl has completely plundered my soul, sl heaven for me would be to find a peaceful and serene corner of the Grid, full of melody, trees and all the trappings of the countryside, with maybe daisies, foxgloves and a dandelion or two. Somewhere you’d perhaps find me following the river down to a happy and pleasant retreat – and, much of the time, that is is indeed exactly where you’d find me. However, hang fire just a moment, because my mind is a perverse – and often illogical – place, and more often than not, you’ll also find me gravitating towards the perhaps less respectable, and more disreputable sims that are scattered around sl… those urban, no-go zones, that look and feel as gritty – and often more so – than the real life ghettoes and mean streets that they attempt to replicate.

anarchy4_001Weird, isn’t it that the very places that drive me bonkers in the real world cry to me, once in the virtual world, and i can’t keep myself away from them? Some girls, it seems, don’t know what’s good for them, but in my defence, the urban blight of rl is very different from the virtual cityscapes of sl.

The bottom line is that i find myself drawn towards the dangerous beauty of the dark alleys and dead ends of the city, and i do like to play with fire. It’s a stupid girl who attempts to do that in rl, but in sl you can be a midnight rambler through the darkest and most despicable of city ‘hoods,  whilst all about you your neighbors – the good time women, and the street fighting man go about their dirty work; whilst the factory girl and Sister Morphine, the stoned stupid girl, hope to sway the outcome of the tumbling dice, although they stand no chance of winning. Ugly isn’t it? In the real world, wild horses wouldn’t see me in such a place, yet in sl, try keeping me away!

anarchy10_001Perhaps it’s because the real world can be such a dump – and, lest you think i paint it black rather too zealously, maybe i should mention the 2 stabbings, 5 shootings, 2 bomb scares and the shotgun double murder that have taken place within the square mile in which i live, in just the last 6 months! – that i’ll seek out the dumps, dives and rough justice of sl, precisely because that same frisson of danger and latent fear permeates such places, without the attendant – and very real – risks that wandering the streets after dark in rl can bring. In sl, undercover of the night, i go wild with no expectations that i may put myself in mortal danger – it’s fun, it’s liberating and it gives me the opportunity to look the city squarely in both eyes and tell it, in no uncertain terms, that no matter how hard it may push me in rl: here, i’m in charge and i’ll not fade away!

So, the sl city gives me a chance to fight back and re-assert myself: to take all the frustration, tiredness, mixed emotions and hassle that the modern urban nightmare thrusts upon me, unleash it, and let it loose in an environment that is far more forgiving, so much safer and much less intimidating than its real world equivalent, and little by little, it helps me feel human again.

And it feels good!

decay8_001

s. x

(P.S. Just for fun – a little weekend challenge for you… in a moment of Friday madness, i’ve hidden the names of a whole host of Rolling Stones’ tracks in today’s post. There’s 48 in total – i’ll be so impressed if you get them all! Answers in the comments please, let’s see how well you can do!)

Every day feel the heat in the city
Like the barrel of a smokin’ gun
Read the signs see the lights they’re so pretty
You’re the one now turn me on
Kevin Rudolph – In The City

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4 Responses to The asphalt jungle

  1. Becky says:

    I was here and I enjoyed this 🙂 I find I get precisely the opposite yen to living in one of the biggest and busiest cities on the the planet. I tend to surround myself with as much nature as I possibly can. But what you do isn’t weird at all, I can completely appreciate how empowering it can feel to “take back the night”.

    • Isn’t that the great thing about sl? No matter how logical, illogical, down-to-earth or weird and wonderful the path you find your feelings taking you, it’s a rare occasion that we can’t find something that can ‘scratch the itch’!
      s. x

  2. Being a relative youngster in sl I don’t know of such places, it has all been such a sweetness and light experience for me. Yesterday i visited Westphalia a wonderful construct of renaissance art, paintings buildings and gardens. Seren have you thought about putting links (or naming places) in your blog? I make videos and would love to see the seamier side of sl. Suggestions please!

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